Looking for a concealed carry gun chambered in 45 ACP? The new XD-S, the latest offering from Springfield Armory, is proof; big things come in little packages.

“Noticeably unnoticeable” is the tag line for the new concealed carry size handgun, but size is the only thing small about this little dynamo.

Initially chambered in the timeless .45 ACP (with the 9mm and .40 in the works), the XD-S is the newest member in the family of XD handguns by Springfield. This single stacker boasts features found only in models like its larger XD cousins, but this little powerhouse turned out to be the sweetheart at SHOT, especially those who ran a few rounds through it during Media Day at the Boulder City Rifle Range.

The gun points are like an extension of your wrist, and though small, the grip makes the XD-S quite manageable even for shooters with smaller hands as I stood and watched many female shooters test the XD-S.

Hardly a bare bones model

What the XD-S lacks in size it makes up for in features.

The XD-S offers a Picatinny rail on the bottom of the frame and according to Springfield is one of the smallest polymer frame handguns that offer this feature.

The low profile sights prevent the pistol from hanging on a holster at a most inopportune time.

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Other features include what Springfield calls the Maximum Reach Magazine release. The modified contour of the XD (M) the bigger cousin of the XD-S, allows a shooter with virtually any hand size to release the magazine without twisting or adjusting from your shooting grip. Those of us with spade-like hands appreciate this feature.

The XD-S feels like a compact handgun, not a toy. This is in part due to one of two interchangeable backstraps to provide the most comfortable and an easy to point handgun custom fit to any shooter’s grip.

With a slim contour frame, measuring 1.0 inches, the designers at Springfield feel the XD-S has an ideal grip angle and after shooting the XD-S, I must agree. The sure grip serration gives shooters something to help keep hold of the grip and makes the XD-S more attractive. The slightly rounded design reduces holster malfunctions when drawing the pistol.

The “all-terrain” look of the XD, the secure grip texture, has proven itself so it only made sense to continue it and take it to the next level to with much more coverage on the XD-S ensure not to lose your grip.

The short reset trigger has a short travel and reset to help keep on target and for more accurate follow- up shots.

The blackened metal slide on the XD-S is finished, as are all of the XD series handguns, in Melonite. Unlike traditional black oxide finishes, which are only a few millionths of an inch thick and offer no corrosion resistance, Melonite provides a deep, penetrating finish that protects against corrosion.

Safety at the forefront

The XD-S has many of the same safety features of the larger cousins in the XD family; Ultra Safety Assurance (USA) Trigger system, loaded chamber indicator and grip safety.

The XD-S disassembles like its XD cousins; however the disassembly lever cannot be manipulated when a magazine is inserted into the pistol. Likewise, when the lever is up, a magazine cannot be inserted into the pistol.

Tale of the tape

Overall length of the new XD-S is a slight 6.3 inches with a barrel length of 3.3 inches. The width of the handgun at its widest point is a scant 1.0 inch. The XD-S holds six rounds, five in the magazine with one in the chamber, and weighs a scant 21.5 ounces.

The XD-S is slated to be shipped in March. Retail for the XD-S Black is $599.00. The Bi-Tone will retail for $699.00.

For more information on the XD-S, visit www.xdspistol.com.

Steve Felgenhauer is a freelance writer and full time gunsmith. His burning interest began as a youngster, not just shooting but how firearms work. After a stint in the service, he put his GI Bill to good use and attended gunsmithing school. Twenty plus years later, that fire still burns for gunsmithing and his writing. He has written hundreds of articles on the subject of shooting, firearms, and hunting. He has produced curriculum for gunsmithing schools and currently is on the Curriculum Advisory Committee at a well respected gunsmithing school.