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[dcs_fancy_header bgcolor=”#ffffff” color=”#000000″ fweight=”bold”]Tribe One is a specialty company offering unique tie-down and securement solutions for the outdoors and tactical community with products including an innovative attachment point solution, bungee nets and the ongoing development of real-world problem-solving for the challenges faced in securing loads in the field.[/dcs_fancy_header]

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Almost all of us in the tactical field drool over the latest gear and accessories for everything from weapons to clothing, and many of us are self-proclaimed pack-junkies quick to snatch up the latest in rucksack and tactical bag options (although whether or not we actually have anything to put in that bag yet can sometimes be irrelevant.) While we typically pay careful consideration to the pockets, load capacity, weatherproofing and any number of features that a pack may boast, we inevitably end up slapping on 100 MPH tape, bungees, paracord, zip-ties and even rubber bands to get our load-out right where we want it. One challenge that is often difficult to overcome, however, is a lack of anchor points. D-rings and webbing occasionally fit the need of securing gear that can’t be thrown in a bag or need to be readily accessible, but there just never seems to be enough of them to go around.

Tribe One is a business built on the innovation of a group of adventure-seekers that are turning their solutions to every-day challenges into effective and marketable products that are applicable to a wide range of uses. One of my most-used pieces, the OP Series MiniNet™ with PackTach™ anchor points was originally developed for outdoor enthusiasts to secure their camping and hiking gear but also provides a convenient and effective tactical application for those rucks that require just a little more storage space than your sack might allow.

Tribe One PackTach™ Anchor Points

The unique PackTach™ anchor system that Tribe One has developed is at the heart of their load securing systems. Each anchor point is secured without any need for punching holes in a pack’s material and are made up of two simple components: a standard carabiner clip and an anchor point that rests against the inside of the material. The anchor point creates a space in the material which allows the carabiner clip to slide through a locking groove through the material without having to actually pierce the material. This allows for an anchor point to be added to any spot on a pack, or any variety of gear. The anchor can be placed on a wide variety of materials including ripstop, canvas, light tarps, denim, clothing and any other material that is thin enough to allow for the carabiner to slide through the eyelet in the anchor.

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The anchor is made of Acetal Resin and the carabiner is lightweight aluminum, the combination of which provide a surprisingly strong point for tie-downs with bungees, paracord or even rope and are rated at up to 40 lbs of pull force, which is more than enough for securing most loads. The only minor inconvenience that I noted was the tendency for the anchor points to slip to different positions during extended use. While I first thought that it might help to roughen up the texture on the resin component to create better friction with the sack material, there is a potential for that to cause wear on the sack and typically any slipping can be avoided by working with placement until a good spot is found where it won’t slide. In most cases, the anchor can be wiggled back into position without having to remove the carabiner and thread it back through the material and locking anchor.

Tribe One Nets Secure Your Gear

The netting solutions that Tribe One has come up with are the second important component to their innovative systems and while it seems to be an easy common-sense solution, Tribe One has really done this right. At this time, Tribe One offers 3 different net configurations: The LP Series PackNet™, the OP Series MiniNet™, and the Tribe One RackNet™. Each of these nets are made from durable 3/16” nylon shock cord with the web intersections secured by metal ties and the tie-down points wrapped in rubber sleeves and offer a tensile strength of up to 300lbs. I’ve had the opportunity to use each of these three net solutions over the past year and haven’t experienced any fraying of the shock cords and all the attachment points continue to hold firm ensuring that the net holds its form.

The LP Series PackNet™ is the larger of the two nets specifically designed for use on rucksacks and backpacks. The wide spread of the 6-point system really lets you pack on the gear and when combined with a large sack you can load out enough equipment and supplies for quite a long trek. It’s perfect for securing a small tent, sleeping bag, dry bag and boots to the outside of the sack, allowing more room for supplies or clothing on the inside.

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The OP Series MiniNet™ is the net that I use the most and has supported me on many trips and treks. It’s the perfect size to secure an extra pair of shoes, a jacket, a sleeping bag or any mid-sized item or two and is a perfect match for my Tactical Tailor Modular Operator Pack. With a 4-point system and a smaller spread in the webbing, this net provides convenient external storage when you need quick access to a jacket, a smaller gear bag or any other equipment that you might not want to bury too deep in your sack.

As the name suggests, the RackNet™ has been designed primarily for securing loads to a rack, such as on an ATV, a boat or even a vehicle’s roof rack. I use it frequently to secure equipment and cases in the back of my truck to keep items from sliding around and the two sliding hubs on the net really make it easy to adjust the crossing pattern of the shock cords in order to distribute the coverage of the net. This is a very versatile system and can be applied to any number of uses with its flexible 4-point or 6-point configuration.

Tribe One Innovation and Durability

As a gear nut, the innovation that Tribe One has shown in developing their products is one of their most attractive factors. The shooting, hunting, outdoors and tactical industry offers a climate where individuals and companies are always coming up with new, interesting and often times exciting products and along with that development comes testing and many reviews. As with most of the products that I review, I give things a good bit of time to break in and get a good feel for how long they would last and in the case of the Tribe One products that I have been using, the quality speaks for itself. I’m looking forward to seeing what new and creative solutions they come up with!

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Joshua Haarbrink is a consultant and traveler with a diverse background including more than 10 years of experience in loss prevention, surveillance, security services and fugitive recovery, as well as various creative writing and editing projects and other unique professional adventures. He is a shooting enthusiast and regular contributor to Guns & Tactics Magazine.