Every vehicle needs storage. Depending on the type of vehicle, some may have more than others. That being said, there are some things that the driver or passenger need to access on a fairly regular basis or very quickly in case of an emergency. For example, my wife needs her chap stick on a fairly regular basis and if she can’t find it, then we have an emergency. Some of us, like many of you, like to keep things close to our fingertips. Pens, knives, flashlights etc. A company called Zulu Nylon Gear has addressed this type of storage solution with their MOLLE Visor Organizer Panel.

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The Visor Panel is 12×6 or for smaller vehicle visors they offer a Micro Visor Panel which is a 9×6 offering. I ordered the larger panel for my truck in Coyote Brown. There are also other colors available to include, Black, Foliage, Multicam, ATACS and Ranger Green. The panel is pretty simple. Made from thick, seeming durable fabric, the visor wraps around the visor and is held in place with Velcro straps.

Once side of the panel has two pouches for things like proof of insurance, maps or love letters from the Mrs. Also included are three elastic loops for various items like chem lights (or chapstick). The company name is also proudly displayed. The flip side there are three rows of MOLLE webbing. The outside rows are elastic while the center row is static. The dividing rows can accommodate hook and loop pouches or patches. With the MOLLE webbing any compatible pouch can be installed. Keep in mind, every vehicle visor is different, meaning some will fall down with little resistance, while others will stay in place. This will determine how much you can load up your visor panel. One should also consider how they want to mount it as either side can be face up or face down. Personally I didn’t want the MOLLE webbing down as I don’t want to advertize to the world how "tactical" I am and I don’t want to risk all my "gear" ending up in my lap.

After I mounted the visor with the pouches down, I filled the pouches with my proof of insurance, registration, a letter from my daughter and a map. Yes, some people still use those. On the MOLLE side, I installed a Benchmade Triage knife with seatbelt cutter, a couple of pens, chap stick and Elzetta Alpha light. I could have loaded up more, however my visor has the tendency to fall with too much stuff on it and I wanted to minimize the visor profile as to maximize my view out of the windshield. Accessing the equipment in the visor was easy and a nice change from trying to fumble around with the glove compartment or consol. Care should be taken when choosing how to mount your gear. Think about how you will access it and how you will re-install it. Also think about normal driving conditions when said gear is not being used. You don’t want to have the visor down to shield your eyes from the sun, then hit a bump and have it all end up in a pile in your lap. Not fun or safe. It was for this reason I slipped my knife in sideways so it would stay in place with the visor up or down, yet still be accessible in a pinch.

Overall I think the Zulu Nylon Gear MOLLE Visor is a nice addition to any vehicle. It is highly customizable for everyone and keeps the essentials at your fingertips. They are made in the USA and cost between $40.00 and $44.00 depending on the pattern chosen. Take a look for yourself and get your rig visor organized.

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Steve has been a firearms enthusiast for over 20 years and is currently an NRA lifetime member. In 1996 he joined the United States Navy and served as a Special Warfare Combat Crewman (SWCC) at Special Boat Unit 12 (Now renamed Special Boat Team 12). He made two tours during his time of service and spent most of his time in southeast Asia and the Middle Eastern theaters. Upon his Honorable Discharge in 2000, Steve spent the next 10 years earning his Masters Degree and state license as an Architect. Steve brings a unique perspective from both his tactical and design background and is a reviewer and contributor for Guns & Tactics Magazine, Defense Marketing Group and other media outlets.